The wolf army:

It is well known that donkeys make very effective guards for livestock such as cattle and sheep against canine predators such as the wolf and the jackal.
The rule is to always have at least two donkeys in case of guarding against wolves and a ratio of one donkey to twenty head of cattle.
It is recommended that mammoth donkeys be used against wolf predation as they are stronger and wolves will rather avoid the cattle in the presence of such a donkey.Donkeys have a natural instinct to attack canine predators with a vicious assault of biting and kicking. They have no fear of wolves.
Donkeys are already being used in this way by various cattle ranchers and sheep farmers all over the world.Join our campaign in making this known to ranchers and sheep farmers. 
There is more to a donkey than meets the eye: They need no training. They eat of the land like the stock they are guarding. They are generally friendly toward humans.

Same goes for lamas!  ”Guard lamas” have been used to protect sheep herds in the US since the 70’s with great success! They crave no training and get easily attatched to the herd of sheep they are introduced to, which it will naturally guard against canids such as wolves.
Lamas approach predators with alarming sounds as a warning, and if that doesn’t work it will spit (yes, spit!) and kick at the predator. 

This graph shows loss of sheep to predators before (left) and after (right) lamas were introduced.

The wolf army:

It is well known that donkeys make very effective guards for livestock such as cattle and sheep against canine predators such as the wolf and the jackal.

The rule is to always have at least two donkeys in case of guarding against wolves and a ratio of one donkey to twenty head of cattle.

It is recommended that mammoth donkeys be used against wolf predation as they are stronger and wolves will rather avoid the cattle in the presence of such a donkey.
Donkeys have a natural instinct to attack canine predators with a vicious assault of biting and kicking. They have no fear of wolves.

Donkeys are already being used in this way by various cattle ranchers and sheep farmers all over the world.
Join our campaign in making this known to ranchers and sheep farmers.

There is more to a donkey than meets the eye: They need no training. They eat of the land like the stock they are guarding. They are generally friendly toward humans.

Same goes for lamas!  ”Guard lamas” have been used to protect sheep herds in the US since the 70’s with great success! They crave no training and get easily attatched to the herd of sheep they are introduced to, which it will naturally guard against canids such as wolves.

Lamas approach predators with alarming sounds as a warning, and if that doesn’t work it will spit (yes, spit!) and kick at the predator. 

This graph shows loss of sheep to predators before (left) and after (right) lamas were introduced.

6 months ago with 1651 notes
Posted on Sunday February 23rd
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    This is also much, much healthier for wild wolf populations, considering how guard dogs often end up mating with them…
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    Yes!
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